October 2010 #185

Popular Woodworking October 2010 issueThe cover project of the October 2010 Popular Woodworking issue is an Arts & Crafts sideboard by Robert W. Lang that combines classic elements from Gustav Stickley, Harvey Ellis and Greene & Greene.

Michael Dunbar reveals how to understand and use a bowsaw – a traditional tool that is woefully misunderstood by modern woodworkers.

In his second installment, Toshio Odate and his assistant add an innovative drawer design to Magobei’s dining table.

Marc Adams contends that veneer is the future. In this first of a series of articles, he shows how to get started using this material that was used on the finest furniture of the past.

A shop experiment answers the question of where glue goes, and leads its author to adopt a new gluing technique.

Peter Follansbee shows how to build an unusual 17th-century three-legged turned chair.

The I Can Do That project is a rustic factory cart coffee table.

Bob Flexner teaches you the best ways to optimize a spray gun.

George R. Walker takes us on a visit to the shop of designer and craftsman Brooke Smith.

Our staff tests an Earlex Spray Station, a Karl Holtey No. 82 and the Bosch Power Box stereo in this issue’s Tool Test.

Detailed article previews are below. Online Extras (downloads, etc.) can be found inside each article.

[description]Articles from the October 2010 issue of Popular Woodworking Magazine[/description][keywords]Popular Woodworking Magazine, Magazine Articles, Technique Articles, Project Articles, Tool Reviews, Finishing[/keywords]
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Arts & Crafts Buffet

Recipe for successful design: Steal your ideas from the best. By Robert W. Lang Pages: 26-33From the October 2010 issue # 185 Buy this issue nowI designed this buffet cabinet a couple years ago for a weekend seminar on Arts & Crafts joinery. After the class I added a 3-D model to the Popular Woodworking...

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I Can Do That: Factory Cart Coffee Table

This reproduction of an industrial workhorse will give you years of use in your living room. By Drew Depenning Pages: 24-25From the October 2010 issue # 185 Buy this issue nowAt the turn-of-the-century, no factory existed without several industrial carts (also known as trucks) at its disposal. From hauling lumber to carrying crankshafts to serving...

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Arts & Mysteries: Three-Legged Turned Chair

Panel seat requires beefy tenons for support. By Peter Follansbee Pages: 22-23From the October 2010 issue # 185 Buy this issue nowSeventeenth-century chairs come in many styles: plain turned chairs with woven seats, carved joined chairs in leather or wool, and one particular type of chair that is a little unusual these days - the...

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Design Matters: Brooke Smith

A visit to the shop of a designer & craftsman By George R. Walker Pages: 20-21From the October 2010 issue # 185 Buy this issue nowCreativity is a slippery thing. A lucky few are born with a creative streak that seems to flower without effort. Others (most of us) have to work at it to...

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Tool Test: Not Just for the Jobsite

By Glen D. Huey Page: 18 From the October 2010 issue # 185 Buy this issue now Our shop sound system was on its last leg when the Bosch Power Box 360S (PB360S) arrived. We pulled the sound system from its box and fired it up. It’s impressive. The fi ve speakers and lone...

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Tool Test: Karl Holtey’s No. 982 Smoothing Plane

By Christopher Schwarz Page: 18 From the October 2010 issue # 185 Buy this issue now Since the 1980s, planemaker Karl Holtey has been an innovator in the world of toolmaking. He has set the bar for the level of fit and finish a tool can achieve. And his No. 98 plane sparked the...

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On the Level: How You Can Save Woodworking

By Christopher Schwarz Page: 8 From the October 2010 issue # 185 Buy this issue now Almost every week I get a message from a woodworker who is terrifi ed that we are the last generation of people who will build furniture in our home workshops. I’m not nearly as apocalyptic, but I do...