Cut, Glue & Sand Veneer


Part 2: Simple and inexpensive tools are the core of a successful veneering job.
By Marc Adams
Pages: 40-47

From the November 2010 issue # 186
Buy this issue now

For nearly 30 years I have worked with veneer as one of my principal materials in all my furniture pieces. What I enjoy the most about working with veneer is that it’s a form of “silent” woodworking. It can be done without the running of loud machinery. It offers more design opportunities, is forgiving and offers a great way to embellish any type of project. I love the challenge of cutting, arranging and pressing veneer. Even today there is a thrill of taking a finished panel out of the press to see the results.

The darker side of veneer is taking that finished panel out of the press and finding that it has some kind of failure, especially after all that effort.

Working with veneer involves skill – not talent. Anyone can do it. The process involves cutting veneer, arranging it, taping, choosing the proper glue and core, pressing, removing the tape, sanding and preparing it for finish. Each step is a process of its own that will make the next step easier and more successful.
Blog: Read Robert W. Lang’s blog entries about his visit to a veneer mill.
Web site: Visit the web site for the Marc Adams school of Woodworking.
To buy: Get veneer from Certainly Wood.
In our store: “The Woodworker’s Guide to Veneering & Inlay,” by Jonathan Benson.


From the November 2010 issue # 186
Buy this issue now