November 2008 #172

Popular Woodworking November 2008 issueThe November 2008 issue of Popular Woodworking features dirt-simple router jigs designed and built by senior editor Glen D. Huey. He shows you his 11 best no-frills router jigs and techniques.

Our series of articles by Robert W. Lang and David Mathias continues with Everyday Greene & Greene where we take a tour of the non-public spaces of 10 Greene & Greene homes.

Frank Klausz shows us the bowsaw basics.

With just five tools and a little practice, Senior Editor Glen D. Huey will help you with your first fan carving.

Marc Adams helps you avoid kickback at the table saw.

We learn that when copying famous furniture, imitation could be illegal.

Detailed article previews are below.

[description]Articles from the November 2008 issue of Popular Woodworking Magazine[/description][keywords]Popular Woodworking Magazine, Magazine Articles, Technique Articles, Project Articles, Tool Reviews, Finishing[/keywords]
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Colonial-Era Plate Rack

Although this project uses 40 feet of moulding, it’s quite simple to make. By Kerry Pierce Pages: 53-57 From the November 2008 issue #172 Buy this issue now My wife and I recently attended our niece’s wedding in Ft. Wayne, Ind. We realized after checking into the hotel that we had several hours to...

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Bowsaw Basics

An ancient European tool that still has a place in the modern American shop. By Frank Klausz Pages: 42-44 From the November 2008 issue #172 Buy this issue now Why should you own a bowsaw? Why not? You have many other tools that you use only when you need them. Seriously, if you make...

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Dirt-simple Router Jigs

Improve your router techniques with simple, shop-made jigs that are easy to use and just as simple to build. By Glen D. Huey Pages: 36-41 From the November 2008 issue #172 Buy this issue now I’m a power-tool woodworker. Sure I use hand tools for some parts of furniture building, specifically when cutting dovetails....

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Tool Test: Dual-disc Sander Reduces Vibration

By Glen D. Huey Page: 34 From the November 2008 issue #172 Buy this issue now In the previous issue of Popular Woodworking ( #171), we reviewed variable-speed random-orbit sanders. We had this 5″-diameter Craftsman Professional Vibrafree sander (# 25927) prior to testing, but this is a single-speed tool (12,000 orbits per minute), and...

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Tool Test: Handmade Hamilton Marking Gauges

By Christopher Schwarz Page: 32 From the November 2008 issue #172 Buy this issue now Traditional marking gauges look good to the eye, but they don’t always fit comfortably in your hand. Two marking gauges by Hamilton Woodworks are shaped so you can lay a precise line with ease – your finger pressure goes...

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Tool Test: New Bosch T308B Blades Clean House

By Robert W. Lang Page: 32 From the November 2008 issue #172 Buy this issue now Jigsaws excel at certain tasks, but have never been known for making nice cuts. After cutting the odd curve, you need to follow behind to remove the telltale saw marks. Until now. What has changed is the blade,...

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Tool Test: Triton’s Bargain Sander

A nice price and extra sanding sleeves make this spindle sander a good choice. By Christopher Schwarz Page: 32 From the November 2008 issue #172 Buy this issue now With a price tag of about $150, the Triton TC450SPS seems a bargain for anyone who wants an oscillating spindle sander. But the question at...

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The Wood Whisperer: Varnish on a Butcher Block? Yep!

There’s nothing wrong with tradition – but tradition is time consuming. By Marc Spagnuolo Pages: 30-31 From the November 2008 issue #172 Buy this issue now OK, raise your hand if you’ve made a butcher block in the last two years. I am willing to bet my best Fujihiro chisel that more than half...

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Arts & Mysteries: 18th-century Chairmaking

Building a Philadelphia Chippendale chair – part 1 By Adam Cherubini Pages: 24-28 From the November 2008 issue #172 Buy this issue now There are few pieces of furniture more difficult to build than a formal chair. The structural requirements of any chair are tricky. But when curvilinear elements and angles are introduced, the...