February 2008 #167

Popular Woodworking February 2008 issueThe cover project for the February 2008 issue of Popular Woodworking is a maple chimney cupboard. It’s perfect for packing a large amount of storage in a small footprint, and is an exercise in 7 traditional joinery methods.

Marc Adams continues his Woodworking Essentials series on working smart and working safe with a guide to using the jointer.

Christopher Schwarz shares his method for flattening the top of a solid-wood workbench.

Adam Cherubini provides a list of 18th-century tools every woodworker should have in their kit.

Our I Can Do That project is a Shaker firewood box.

Jig Journal features a scratch-stock you can make quickly and easily.

Rob Millard shows us how to create a simple fan inlay.

We test four honing guides.

A great method for hiding your mistakes.

Tool Test takes a close look at a new jointer/planer combination machine from Grizzly.

Detailed article previews are below. Online Extras (downloads, etc.) for this issue are found inside their respective articles.

[description]Articles from the February 2008 issue of Popular Woodworking Magazine[/description][keywords]Popular Woodworking Magazine, Magazine Articles, Technique Articles, Project Articles, Tool Reviews, Finishing[/keywords]
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Chimney Cupboard

Seven solid joints comprise this sturdy custom storage unit. By Megan Fitzpatrick & Glen D. Huey Pages: 62-69 From the February 2008 issue #167 Buy this issue now There’s a backstory to this chimney cupboard project. Last March, I planned a week off to renovate the 6 1/2′ x 8′ bathroom in my 110-year-old...

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Basic Inlay Techniques

Simple techniques and small details can add visual interest to your projects. By Rob Millard Pages: 57-61 From the February 2008 issue #167 Buy this issue now Inlays, even simple ones, can add a great deal of visual interest to a woodworking project. Unfortunately, too many woodworkers have never tried inlay due to its...

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Woodworking Essentials: Power Jointers

A Better Way to Work: Part 3 By Marc Adams Pages: 41-56 From the February 2008 issue #167 Buy this issue now One of the very first lessons of working wood is how to “S4S” a board – surface it on all four sides. One small caveat to the process is that the board...

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Flatten a Workbench’s Top

Is it necessary? And if so, what are the best techniques? By Christopher Schwarz Pages: 36-40 From the February 2008 issue #167 Buy this issue now Like any tool or machine, a workbench requires accessories (jigs, fixtures, appliances) and occasional maintenance to actually do anything of great value. A bench without a bench hook...

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Tool Test: Machined Dovetail Jigs for any Budget

By Glen D. Huey Page: 33 From the February 2008 issue #167 Buy this issue now It didn’t take me long to figure out I needed to use dovetail joints on my furniture. The problem at the time was how to make tails and pins so they were correct and looked good. Dovetail jigs...

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Tool Test: Scientific Approach to Hand-cut Dovetails

By Robert W. Lang Page: 33 From the February 2008 issue #167 Buy this issue now The first impression most people (including me) have of this saw is one of disbelief. Backsaws have been one-handed tools since their inception, so why would anyone want to use two hands? The answer is part of a...

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Tool Test: Two Jobs, One Machine

European-style machines blend two major machines into a small space in the workshop. By Glen D. Huey Page: 32 From the February 2008 issue #167 Buy this issue now Combination machines, European-style machinery that combines the jointer and planer into a single tool, will quickly become big winners with home hobbyists and smallwoodworking business...