We’d Love to Hear What You Think

Every time I write about a new product (such as the new “Sharpen Your Handsaws” DVD from Ron Herman), a day or two later, I remember something about which I forgot to write…and that is that we want to know what you think about the DVDs, books, CDs, etc. you’ve bought from us.

As does a certain massive online retailer/bookstore, we invite you to write product reviews and rate the stuff you’ve bought from us, as that helps others make buying decisions. (And rest assured – we don’t erase non-complimentary reviews…unless they’re outrageously unfounded or would warrant an NC-17 rating.)

There’s a tiny little “Customer Ratings” box on the ShopWoodworking.com page for every product – I’ve identified it in the picture above with an orange arrow – and we welcome your feedback – good or bad.

Thanks!

— Megan Fitzpatrick

 

18 thoughts on “We’d Love to Hear What You Think

  1. Guido

    Hi Glenn/Megan…

    Any possibility of recording some of your sessions (e.g. the Powermatic series) in some sort of “quick and dirty” and minimal cost format? They wouldn’t have to be professional quality, or edited; perhaps just taping a real class. A disclaimer preface would be all that we’d need to realize why it might not be perfect.

    Most of us have little hope of getting to your classes but would love to gain a bit of insight into some of these topics. Thanks for considering this.

    BTW your site is AWESOME !!

    Tony

    1. Megan Fitzpatrick Post author

      Tony,

      I’m sad to report that we don’t have the equipment, bodies or rights to tape WIA sessions from non-employee speakers – but we’ll look into it for our staff.

  2. Prairie Guy

    What holds me back from buying is the exorbitant shipping costs to Canada. Sometimes twice the cost of the book or video. Would you look into USPS ground.

  3. gangy543

    I have a question for mr. schwarz. On your light bulb lamp(I have finished the lamp) how are the eye bolts attached to the base.
    Thanks! James Hankins

  4. rbukoski

    I have a question for some one, we have recently recieved a small dresser which has a marble top but the dresser was stored in the basement for at least50+ years and is dryed out, needs to be reglued, but smells likeold musty furnature. What I would like to knoy is how do you get the musty smell out of the wood?

    1. Megan Fitzpatrick Post author

      The likely culprit is mildew or some kind of mold — can you see any staining and/or discoloration on the wood (probably on interior surfaces)? If so, you need to clean those areas with something that will kill it – a vinegar and water solution or lemon juice and water solution (or any number of appropriate cleaning products). Then, I’d air out the drawers in the sun – but only if the humidity isn’t too high (and keep in mind that exposure to sunlight can change a wood’s color, so if you don’t want to risk that, cover the drawer fronts).

      If mold doesn’t seem to be the problem, try sprinkling a layer of baking soda over the drawer bottoms and letting it sit for a few days before vacuuming it off.

      I’ve tried the baking soda solution with success (but if the smell comes back after a little while, then it probably is mold, even if you can’t see it).

  5. introp

    This is a bit of a tangent, but as it wouldn’t help to place it on the review section of various books, I’ll ask here: what’s the possibility of getting an ebook form of the various books in your shop? My household is pretty far along the transition into a mostly-bookshelf-less (I know, gasp!) form and I’m now a little hesitant to buy more books in print form.

    I know it’s a long shot, but since you publish a PDF form of your magazine (for which I have a subscription), it can’t hurt to ask.

    1. Megan Fitzpatrick Post author

      introp – we have one at this point: “Handplane Essentials” and we’ll be offering at least a couple more in the near future. But, HE (as well as any books on the near horizon) is in PDF format – we haven’t figured out a good way to offer step-by-step books in eReader format that doesn’t support big pictures (e.g. Kindle). It’s really the step-by-step picture thing vs. technical stuff that’s keeping us back from that (I love reading novels on my iPad – but I’m not sure I’m ready to take that in the shop just yet…)

      1. introp

        Ah, I hadn’t seen the ebook option for Handplane Essentials; I’ll put it on my wish list for the next round of book-crazy. I totally understand the format troubles; I prefer epub since they reflow better on my varied-screen-size devices (and seem to chew less battery than rendering PDFs) but I know how much of a pain it can be to make layout-sensitive material work in them, so I’ll take PDF books if that’s what is available.

        Thank you for your response and your continued support for those of us with more LCD displays than bookshelf space!

  6. Richard Dawson

    Megan,

    I agree with a good bit of what Dusty says, but while I have more books and tools than I need, I haven’t reached a point where I know more than I need to. There is always a fresh perspective, which is probably Chris’ strongest attribute, so I am open to new material. Previews and reviews can be helpful.

    The burning question for me is: Who will assign the NC-17 ratings, given allegations made by Mr. Schwarz regarding less than polite language presumably used by a certain editor?

    Richard

    1. Megan Fitzpatrick Post author

      Ha! I do have the mouth of a fishwife from time to time…

      I’ll see if we can get a trailer up on the shopwoodworking.com site.

  7. Dusty

    Megan,

    After many years in woodworking my mind has become numb to the reviews of woodworking books and tools. I have read more woodworking books then I needed to and bought more tools then I should have, (just ask my wife).
    One never knows when a a Benedick or a Dogberry will prevail, in truth I find reviews to be of much ado about nothing and let the material stand for itself.

    1. Megan Fitzpatrick Post author

      Fair enough – and Dogberry is one of my favorite characters! But to my mind, the best line from that play is, “I was born to speak all mirth and no matter.”

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