Author Archives: AdminCherubini

Posting Blog Comments

I invite readers to post comments to my blog. There are couple things that I want you to know. 1) There is no free speech on the internet. But I allow criticism on my little corner of the internet. My other PW collegues do the same which I’m very proud of. That isn’t the...

GWOT: Global War on Tablesaws

I just read another post about a fellow who hurt himself on his table saw. I think it takes guts to report an injury like this on a wood working forum and I applaud all who do. Unfortunately, I’ve seen several such posts and I don’t read the “Normal” forums. I make all sorts...

Old Tools

Craftsmen in Colonial Williamsburg prefer NOT to use antique tools. When asked they say things like “they aren’t making any more of these”. Besides the irony of that statement (CW is indeed making more of those), I believe preserving old tools by using them is generally a good thing. Many tools see little wear...

Learning about Furniture: History v. Archeology Part III

In my pursuit to learn about period furniture and furniture making, I employ a controversial approach called experimental archeology. Experimental Archeology involves the recreation of past events and relies on the assumption that if the conditions are correctly recreated, results of the experiment will be similar to past events. In my woodworking, I typically...

Learning about Furniture: History v. Archeology Part II

There are few “smoking gun” historical documents dating from the 18th century. Moxon’s “Mechanicks Exercises” was written in the late 17th century. Peter Nicholson’s “Mechanic’s Companion” was written in the early 19th century. The only source I know of dating from the 18th century is Roubo’s “L’Art du Mensuier”. These texts are both enlightening...

Learning about Furniture: History v. Archeology Part I

I’ve been surfing various wood forums lately and I’ve seen a pleasing amount of discussion on period furniture. As all of you know, you hear contradictory things on the internet. A recent discussion about 18th c drawer construction still has my head spinning. Seeing Allan Breed’s recent post, originating from a sapfm forum post...

Style and Structure in 18th c Furniture

I really love the bold style of William and Mary furniture. Unlike the styles that preceded it, William and Mary features modern construction techniques. Chests and drawers were dovetailed together. Thinner pieces of wood were used. Drawers were no longer side hung. Nails were less prominent. In my mind, William and Mary style furniture...