Tool Test: Veritas Dovetail Saw


New saw design opens the door to hand sawing.
By Robert W. Lang
Page: 30

From the April 2009 issue #175
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One of the thrills of woodworking is learning a new technique and adding a new skill. Many new skills require a new tool, and the cost of the tool can become a stumbling block. The ability to saw by hand was taken for granted by our grandfathers. One of the reasons for that was the availability of decent tools at affordable prices.

Thirty years ago, there simply wasn’t a new, decent quality Western-style saw available at any price. If you wanted to learn how to saw by hand, your best bet was a Japanese saw. These were sharp and usable out of the box, but they cut on the pull stroke instead of the push. Would Japanese cars be as popular as they are if they were only available with the steering wheel on the right?

Small toolmakers have since filled the gap with Western saws made the old-fashioned way, and many a woodworker has since had an epiphany about sawing. It isn’t that hard if you have a good tool. But the price for switching on that light bulb in your brain is out of reach for some. Handmade saws that retail for more than $100 are actually well worth it and a good value – if you know how to use a saw and what to look for when you go to buy one.


From the April 2009 issue #175
Buy this issue now