Tool Test: Lie-Nielsen No. 101 Block Plane

Lie-Nielsen N0. 101 Block PlaneBy Megan Fitzpatrick
Page 16

This wee bronze plane from Warren, Maine, is a reproduction (of sorts) of the Stanley No. 101 plane – a small block plane originally designed for household use and light work (and sold in toy tool chests, according to Patrick Leach’s “Blood and Gore” web site).

But unlike its inspiration, this new version from Lie-Nielsen, which is also called a violin maker’s plane, has all the same features as its slightly larger cousin, the No. 102, including a stainless steel adjuster to advance and retract the blade.

With a sole just less than 3″ long and 11⁄4″ wide, the plane fits comfortably in even the smallest hands, and its size allows you to work very locally indeed, and in tight spaces – and anywhere else you’d typically turn to a block plane. Plus, it’s the perfect size for slipping into an apron pocket or even your pants pocket.

The 7⁄8″-wide A2 steel iron is bedded at 20° for a typical 45° cutting angle.

Web site: www.lie-nielsen.com
Video:
See the No. 101 plane in action.

From the August 2012 issue #198
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