Stickley Mantel Clock

Attention to detail pushes this Stickley design, and the builder, to another level.
By Glen D. Huey
Pages: 48-54

From the December 2008 Issue #173
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A few years prior to his brothers taking over the furniture business, Gustav Stickley, the grandfather of the Arts & Crafts movement, produced what might at first glance appear to be an ordinary mantel clock. A closer look reveals many remarkable details. It’s the details that make this project more than just a box containing a clock movement.

Take a look at where the top of the clock meets the sides. Is Stickley over the top with the number of pins and tails? I guess. But that’s a detail that influences the overall look of the clock. Through-tenons that have chamfered ends is another small detail, as is the leaded glass window that reveals the swinging pendulum. And the 12-sided clock-face opening certainly grabs your attention; it’s certainly not as easy to cut as a simple circle. But at the end of the project, you’ll have a clock worthy of a sacred spot on your mantel.

Online Extras

To read a blog entry about making the art glass window for the Stickley Mantel Clock, click here.

* To view a PDF of the clock face pattern for the Stickley Mantel Clock, click here.

* To read an article about the Stickley Mantel Clock’s fumed finish, click here.

* To download a SketchUp model of the Stickley Mantel Clock project from the Google 3D Warehouse, click here.

From the December 2008 issue #173
Buy this issue now