Plunge-cut Saws


These saws are the best for breaking down sheet goods, if that’s one of your shop chores. But you’ll need to dig into the features to make your purchase decision.
By Glen D. Huey
Pages: 50-53

From the April 2009 issue #175
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Since DeWalt and Makita entered the United States plunge-cut saw market with Festool, the three have received immense interest and discussion. How are the saws different? Are the results of a crosscut or rip cut any cleaner than those made at a table saw? What features are common or unique on plunge-cut saws? I scrutinized a DeWalt DWS520, a Festool TS55 and a Makita SP6000 to see which, if any, of the saws stand out.

If you’re looking for vast differences in the cuts produced by the various plunge-cut saws, I’m afraid you’re going to be disappointed. I used each saw to cut plywood and hardwood, both with and across the grain, and for slicing samples of melamine. There is a small amount of tear-out (mostly across the grain as you might expect), but nothing significant. In fact, I compared those cuts with cuts made in the same materials at a table saw and again, the differences are minimal.


From the April 2009 issue #175
Buy this issue now