Hardware Hideaway

screwboxStore handles, hinges and fasteners in this handsome dust-free organizer.

by Glen D. Huey
pages 33-37

While exploring in an antique store, I found a small, two-level lidded box that would be ideal to store the loads of extra hardware I have stowed in plastic bags. No longer would I need to search endlessly for brads, bails and back plates; everything would be in one place.

The price of the antique, however, was too rich for my wallet, so I took a photo and used the “dollar-bill” method of measuring (a piece of United States paper money is approximately 6″ in length). Even if my memory was defective, my notes, measurements and pirated photo could get me close.

Build the Jig
Both the box and the tray, which fits inside and rests on the lower layer of cubbies, are assembled using box joints (also called finger joints) that I cut at the table saw. Box joints have plenty of glue surface for a strong bond, but are easier than dovetails to whip out by machine. In fact, they are perfect for shop builds. (The same basic process is also a great technique for making dentil moulding.)

Video: Watch how a pyromaniac might turn zinc-plated hinges into black beauties.
Blog: Read another method for adding the appearance of age to new hardware using chemicals.
In our store: Follow Peter Ross’ method to produce your own hand-forged hinges.
Free SketchUp Model: Download a 3D model of this project.
From the June 2014 issue, #211

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