Great Woodshops: Fertile Fields

In the last 11 years, Marc Adams’s woodworking school has experienced explosive growth.
By Kara Gebhart
Pages: 94-98

From the December 2004 issue #145
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It’s an unusually cool August day, and Marc Adams has all the doors of his woodworking school swung open, letting the bright Indiana sunshine in. In an intarsia class with Garnet Hall, scrollsaws hum. In a “mastering woodworking” class, 18 students applaud after Stephen Proctor finishes a quick seminar. And in a furniture design class, instructor Graham Blackburn watches as a student presents his latest furniture-design idea.

It’s Friday, the last day for all three classes. Despite the long hours each student has put in, smiles abound. On average, they traveled 500 miles to be here. For most, this is their fifth or sixth time at the school. And they all paid good money, for good reason.

“It’s a lot of fun,” says Martin Lutz, from Montrose, Colo., who is taking his fifth class at the Marc Adams School of Woodworking. “And you learn an incredible amount.”

From the December 2004 issue #145
Buy this issue now