From Concept to Completion, Part 2

Detailed drawings, cut lists and grain orientation aid in a successful building process.
By Ted Brown
Pages: 70-73

From the November 2007 issue #165
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We use detailed drawings to capture important relationships between components. It is not always required that we draw the entire piece. If we can draw only the complex parts of the piece, then we save time and effort. I create detailed shop drawings, backed up by dimensioned sketches in my logbook, which can be referred to during construction, or years later. A good example is drawing a section of the legs to show the location of intersecting tenons, the reveal where the apron meets the leg, and the specific dimensions of mortises and tenons.

Online Extra

For a PDF of the Ted Brown Plans, click here.

From the November 2007 issue #165
Buy this issue now