Better Glue Joints

Your joints will last for decades if you know how to apply your glue.
By Lonnie Bird
Pages: 38-41

From the November 2004 issue #144
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Much of woodworking is joinery: An edge-to-edge joint is used to join two or more boards to create a tabletop, dovetails are carefully cut and fit to create a box for a chest of drawers. And the corners of a door frame are joined with a mortise-and-tenon joint.

However, whether it’s a simple butt joint or a complex interlocking joint, glue is typically used to hold everything together. And if you’ve ever been asked to repair a piece of cheap, factory-made furniture (it’s often called curb furniture – it’s used for a few years and then set out on the curb) you’ll see that it’s typically the joint that has failed rather than the wood (assuming real wood was used).

From the November 2004 issue #144
Buy this issue now