Arts & Mysteries: The Secrets to Sawing Fast

The traditional hand saw (when wielded correctly) can size all your stock. Here’s a basic primer.
By Adam Cherubini
Pages: 42-45

From the October 2005 issue #150
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Hand saws were used to make some of the finest furniture ever built. They are very clearly capable of producing accurate cuts. Hand saws require little shop space, and produce little appreciable noise or dust.

These facts conspire to allow work in environments or at hours otherwise inhospitable to modern means. Please don’t underestimate the advantage of working outside, late at night, in the living room or kitchen, etc. Likewise, the elimination of the table saw – or even the reduction of its use – frees up precious workshop floor space, allowing room for other tools, workbenches, finishing areas, etc.

So it appears in advantage after advantage that hand saws are effective if not superior tools. Clearly only 220-volt speed stands in their way of becoming the one essential tool in every woodworker’s shop.

In this, the fourth article in our Arts and Mysteries series, we’ll investigate the secret tricks period woodworkers used to saw quickly. Let’s begin by examining basic technique.

From the October 2005 issue #150
Buy this issue now