Arts & Mysteries: The Mystery of Try Squares

Here’s a clue: Only two faces need be 90°.
By Adam Cherubini
Pages: 32-35

From the August 2006 issue #156
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Furniture makers in the 18th century used shop-made wooden try squares. Though subject to wear and seasonal movement, these squares produced some of the world’s finest woodwork. We’ve learned time and time again that if we want to do good work, it’s important to have the right tool for the job. If you are setting up a table saw blade, an all-metal engineer’s square may be the right tool. But if you are marking tenon shoulders and you want that joint to be tight, you’ll need a wooden square. Wooden try squares feature a level of accuracy unlike all other squares currently available. Making a few for your shop is a great way to spend an afternoon.

From the August 2006 issue #156
Buy this issue now