Arts & Mysteries: Making and Using Sawhorses

Start your woodworking education right.
By Adam Cherubini
Pages: 30-33

From the April 2006 issue #154
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What’s the best sort of workbench to build? What hand tools should I buy first? How many coats of polyurethane are needed to stop a board from cupping? Arts & Mysteries readers e-mail me these and other questions (OK, I made up the last one) and like every woodworker, I’m happy to offer my opinions. I’m just not convinced I’m really helping. As odd as it may sound with all our modern technology and magazine articles like this one, learning to work wood by hand is harder today than it has ever been. People I know who work by hand will often say, “I’m not doing anything new; it’s all been done before.” But that isn’t true. Never before have beginning woodworkers had such high expectations and so little training. The masters of the 18th
century developed their skills as apprentices in commercial shops where all the tools were sharp. I think making sawhorses is a great place to start developing your skills.

From the April 2006 issue #154
Buy this issue now