Arts & Mysteries: 18th-century Chairmaking


Building a Philadelphia Chippendale chair – part 1
By Adam Cherubini
Pages: 24-28

From the November 2008 issue #172
Buy this issue now

There are few pieces of furniture more difficult to build than a formal chair. The structural requirements of any chair are tricky. But when curvilinear elements and angles are introduced, the construction is further complicated by a lack of good square reference faces. Reducing the number of structural elements to four legs and a back doesn’t seem to simplify things in this case. It just means the design is less forgiving of joinery errors.

The need to make the overall form appealing in line and mass is enough to frustrate. Not only are good plans not commonly available, the curved shapes and angles would make any two-dimensional plans difficult to use.


From the November 2008 issue #172
Buy this issue now