Arts & Crafts Occasional Table

BailleScottSideTableConquer some fun joinery challenges with this geometric Baillie Scott build.

by Mitch Roberson
pages 36-42

As soon as I saw Mackay Hugh Baillie Scott’s 1901 occasional table on display at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, I knew I had to make one.

Baillie Scott (1865-1945) was an architect at the forefront of the Arts & Crafts movement in England. His diminutive and elegant table is uncharacteristic of the often substantial and earthy furniture of the Arts & Crafts style.

The lightness and movement of the table, which come from a play between positive and negative space, make it a true piece of sculpture that looks different from every perspective.

Though it is made from only seven parts, this little table presents several challenges. First, there is not a single right angle in sight. The three legs are splayed and joined with curved stretchers angled upward from left to right, which flow into the round top. As if all that were not challenging enough, the legs are tapered and hexagonal.

If you enjoy the problem-solving aspect of making furniture as much as I do, this project is for you. Read on to discover how to face each challenge.

The three legs are joined to the stretchers using floating tenons. The legs and top are joined with wedged through-tenons. Figuring out where the joints go is the goal of a full-size drawing.

Blog: Discover three ways to create an authentic-looking Arts & Crafts finish.
Plan: Download a SketchUp model of this project from our 3D Warehouse.
Website:
See more from the author on his website, Human Hands Woodworking.
Article: Read about loose-tenon joinery.
In Our Store:Building Classic Arts & Crafts Furniture: Shop Drawings for 33 Traditional Charles Limbert Projects,” by Michael Crow.
To Buy:Popular Woodworking’s Arts & Crafts Furniture: 42 Designs for Every Room in Your Home.

From the April 2016 issue #224
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