Arts & Crafts Bridal Chest

Contrasting woods highlight the elegant lines of this Gustav Stickley-designed classic.
By Robert W. Lang
Pages: 76-84

From the November 2005 issue #151
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In days gone by, a chest similar to this would contain a bride’s dowry. The form goes back to Gothic times, but this is an adaptation of a Gustav Stickley piece from 1901. Admiring the lines of this piece, I was curious to see how the design would look with contrasting materials, not the usual Craftsman dark oak. The panels are quilted bird’s eye maple, and the other parts are Jatoba, also known as Brazilian cherry.

The original was made of quartersawn white oak with wrought-iron braces on the corners. What makes this unusual for a Stickley design are the decorative corbels on the panels. These also appeared on a few dining room case pieces made in the early 1900s.

From the November 2005 issue #151
Buy this issue now