BeyondTheVise

Beyond The Vise: Workholding For Hand Tools

Why go beyond the vise? While most workbenches include a vise, it’s not always effective for all hand tool work. Things get even more difficult if you don’t have a good vise, or are working away from your regular workbench. A variety of work holding methods have evolved over the centuries to help out....

benchduck

‘Bench Duck’ – New Workholding from Veritas

At the HandWorks show in Amana, Iowa, last month, Veritas introduced publicly its newest innovation in workholding – a cam-lever hold-down that to me, looks like a duck. So until I’m told the official name of the tool, I’m calling it a Bench Duck. (I’ll likely call it that even after I know the...

Mike Siemsen is a woodworking expert set to speak at the Woodworking in America 2015 event in Kansas City.

Mike Siemsen: Woodworking in America 2015

When Mike Siemsen started work on a reproduction of an Aaron Willard tall case clock built in 1799, he had a lot of help – much of it invisible to others. There was his father, who taught Siemsen basic carpentry skills and a solid work ethic; there was Grant Francis, his high school shop...

PW_Chris's-Bench-2-copy

Revising my First Book, ‘Workbenches’

For the last month, I’ve been revising and expanding my first book “Workbenches: From Design & Theory to Construction & Use” for F+W Media. The revised book is scheduled to be out by the end of 2015 and printed in the United States. I started writing that book in 2005, and a lot has...

Paring

Opening My Mouth

Whatever step I take next in this process of making a jack plane (see part 1 here), I like to have my muse close by and through looking at then trying to replicate, I gain more respect for the tool making art. From a distance the simple rectilinear form of jack, try and jointer...

A miter shooting board with added shimmable faces.

Beyond the Vise: Miter Shooting Board

Many shop-made workholding devices for hand tools can be fairly crude, made quickly from scraps. Shooting boards aren’t like that. They’re precision instruments, and need to be made with care. Because they act as reference guides, any errors in their alignment will result in errors in your work. Miter shooting boards are particularly tricky...